ecliptic latitude


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ecliptic latitude

[i¦klip·tik ′lad·ə‚tüd]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
This perspective, popular among terrestrial cartographers of the time, had parallels of ecliptic latitude shown as equidistant straight lines and the great circles of ecliptic longitude as sloping straight lines.
For the Moon to be as young as possible when seen, it should be near perigee (so it's moving rapidly away from the Sun on the celestial sphere) and also near its greatest ecliptic latitude north or south (which increases its elongation from the Sun at a given age).
The Moon should be near its greatest ecliptic latitude, +5 1/2[degrees] or -5 1/2[degrees], further adding to its elongation angle at a given age.