allocate

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allocate

[′a·lō‚kāt]
(computer science)
To place a portion of a computer memory or a peripheral unit under control of a computer program, through the action of an operator, program instruction, or executive program.
(industrial engineering)
To assign a portion of a resource to an activity.

allocate

To reserve a resource such as memory or storage. See memory allocation.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was a key participant in the comparative economic systems field from the 1950s until the 1990s, a contributor to important ideas in additional fields, a prized teacher, an active citizen of the economics profession and his university, the University of New York at Stony Brook, an accomplished academic administrator, a fantastic colleague, a precious friend, a film and theater enthusiast, and so much more.
Insofar as economic agents accept and abide by the rules, the incumbent economic system lasts.
Speaking on the occasion, Yassar Sakhi Butt President ICCI said that the success or failure of an economic system could be measured by its direct impact on the lives of people who live under that economic system.
Sixty-two percent of Americans say the economic system is fair to them personally, while 36% say it is not.
Perhaps it is time to listen to those 'radicals', 'lefties' or unions that are critical of our economic system and consumerist society.
Institutional diversity plays a comparable role in a balanced economic system.
Islamic economic system is fundamentally different from both capitalism and socialism.
We can't pass laws outlawing greed, but we can begin to work courageously to reform a broken economic system that runs on greed.
The economic system of capitalism itself is not evil.
They also noted that that so far the Forum has only served the interest of businessmen and wealthy people, instead of promoting the world economic system.
and rehabilitation of the central role of the economic system as a regulator and overseer of the first order.
This study is motivated by three concerns: (a) to explore empirically whether the relation found between the political system and happiness also holds for the economic system so that a stylised fact can be established, which can provide a focus on future theoretical economic analysis; (b) to determine which economic institutions are responsible for this relationship, assuming that such a correlation between system and happiness can be found; (c) and to test empirically the two ideological conjectures outlined in the previous paragraph.