ectopic pregnancy


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ectopic pregnancy

[ek¦täp·ik ′preg·nən·sē]
(medicine)
Embryonic development outside the uterus, usually within the Fallopian tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, women with one or more risk factors for an ectopic pregnancy should be closely monitored during the first weeks until an intrauterine sac becomes visible on ultrasound.
One morning the pains got so bad Emma 'couldn't stand up', so Simon rushed her to hospital where they discovered she was suffering from a ruptured ectopic pregnancy.
Speaking about her hospital drama, she said: "There was some concern I might be having an ectopic pregnancy but I'd got a water infection.
Therefore, managing primary hepatic ectopic pregnancy using laparoscopy microsurgery might serve as a more acceptable option.
Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is an uncommon form of ectopic pregnancy resulting from implantation of a blastocyst within myometrial scar tissue in the anterior lower uterine segment (LUS), at the site of prior Cesarean section.
Increased ectopic pregnancy, which may be due to improved diagnostic instruments, could decline catastrophic sequels such as fertility of injured tubes and mortal bleedings by early recognition (8).
A review article in 2008, which analysed six studies showed that TVS has a sensitivity of 74%-84% in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy.
Implantation of the fertilized ovum outside the uterine cavity is considered as ectopic pregnancy and its prevelance is 1 to 2 percent of all pregnancies.
In that case, it's called an ectopic pregnancy or a tubal pregnancy.
The 28-year-old Filipina woman was said to have suffered pregnancy pains before she called an ambulance and was rushed to the hospital to be informed that she had ectopic pregnancy in December.
The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is 10 to 20 per 1000 pregnancies4 which has been tripled in last three decades owing to the increased use of contraceptive devices, tubal reanastromotic procedures and increasing application of artificial reproductive techniques.
Although the authors demonstrate the advantages of the operative laparoscopy approach to the management of ectopic pregnancy, particularly in the low-cost setting, in eliminating patients with an Hb <8 g/dL, a pulse rate <100 beats/minute, and a systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, they may have been managing patients with minimal haemoperitoneum, whose outcomes would have been no different from women with unruptured ectopic pregnancies.