ectotherm


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ectotherm

[′ek·tə‚thərm]
(physiology)
An animal that obtains most of its heat from the environment and therefore has a body temperature very close to that of its environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ectotherms often select temperatures below their maximal physiological capacity (Martin & Huey 2008).
This permitted us to assess the relative contributions of endotherms and ectotherms to the total number of trophic interactions (both within trophic levels and globally), as well as whether or not paths containing more endotherms, or endotherms at particular trophic positions, produced shorter food chain lengths in each web.
The thermoregulatory behavior has been reported in aquatic ectotherms as a homeostatic mechanism, because the organism attempts to keep its internal temperature similar to that of its environment.
A general model for effects of temperature on ectotherm ontogenetic growth and development.
In ectotherms, temperature affects offspring phenotype so that colder mothers produce larger eggs.
Because higher temperatures typically increase the rate of water loss (Slobodchikoff 1983), many ectotherms might face a difficult physiological trade-off: a high Tb may support increased performance through its effect on muscle contraction while simultaneously decreasing performance from desiccation.
In North America, WNV infections in ectotherms were first reported in 2001 (19).
Supercooling capacity of vertebrate ectotherms studied under idealized laboratory conditions (i.
To ectotherms such as marine invertebrates, two important consequences of aerial exposure at low tide are the effects of the environment on body temperature and water loss rates.
The fact that two distinct climate fluctuations affect somewhat independently the length of the growing season and the timing of the breeding season has implications for ectotherm life history.
Metabolic rates of ectotherms typically increase with increasing temperature (Bennett and Dawson, 1976).
Plethodontid salamanders do not conform to "general rules" for ectotherm life histories: insights from allocation models about why simple models do not make accurate predictions.