egest

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Related to egested: excretes

egest

[ē′jest]
(physiology)
To discharge indigestible matter from the digestive tract.
To rid the body of waste.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1) My earlier work on origin of planetary systems, which similarly proposed that planetary materials were egested from the Sun, gave me the privilege of responding to Kompanichenko's brilliant work.
At 5:58 pm on 12 September, the light levels returned to maximum strength from zero--an indication that the tag had likely been egested.
Number of pellets egested or number of prey items/pellet did not vary seasonally.
It removes potassium by exchanging sodium ions for potassium ions in the intestine before the resin is egested.
This difference in mechanism of nutrient balance is important because excreted nutrients are in immediately available chemical forms whereas egested nutrients must undergo further processing before algal uptake, and may be more important to benthic than pelagic processing.
8 -- cords (A) Counts of all material produced, ingested, uningested, and egested by snails, with the percentages of total production per category (column) in parentheses.
The first were those associated with the regression formulae used to calculate the mean size of structure ingested from the original fish fed, and the second were those associated with the errors around the mean size of egested structure (i.
If so, does this have implications for nutrient cycling due to the fact that egested materials are likely to be lost from the water column due to rapid sinking (Sarnelle 1992, Elser et al.
Males and females on the honeysuckle diets exhibited significantly greater mean ingested, egested and assimilated energy values compared to males and females on the juniper diet (Table 1).
Significant costs of particle sorting, digestion, and absorption, evidenced as metabolically derived material egested and assayed within feces, were greatest in species with higher saturated capacities for the ingestion of remaining organics.
The two small anal pores can transport small undigested particles, but larger undigested particles are egested through the mouth, so functionally the gut must be described as sac-shaped (Reeve and Walter, 1978).