egest

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egest

[ē′jest]
(physiology)
To discharge indigestible matter from the digestive tract.
To rid the body of waste.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2) The mechanism was not by ejection due to internal tension and pressure, but is based on the passing out or egestion of accumulated dense matter (or fusion waste that could not efficiently generate more energy from further fusion) due to limited space for fusion and/or for accumulation of such dense matter.
The following mean values were determined: ingestion (I; total amount of food consumed), egestion (E; feces), assimilation (A; ingestion-egestion), assimilation efficiency (AE), secondary production (P; growth), and respiration (R; assimilation-growth).
For active transport via avifauna, islands with significant elevations may constrain avian movement and thus dispersal of plant propagules either via egestion or physical detachment after flight.
Her revenge ends the horrible cycle of unnatural ingestion and egestion which Albert perpetuates, using the vehicle of her sexual liberation as the instrument of retribution upon her repressor.
max] realized, E represents the egestion rate, excretion rate, and specific dynamic action (SDA) losses, and [R.
This process of pellet formation and egestion probably is best known among birds of prey, such as hawks and owls.
Defecation, egestion, extrusion, dejection, purgation, voidance.
A woodcut called "Faust shits the devil" inspired the production's signature "Adolf Shitler" scene, depicting the egestion of the Fuhrer from the bowels of Mephistopheles.
Was his egestion at a state dinner an unsubtle comment on the Japanese refusal to grant further concessions on auto imports?
The peregrine falcon died before medical or surgical intervention was started, and the owl was managed successfully with oral mineral oil and liquid diet to facilitate egestion of the foreign material as a pellet.
The excess energy required for partial digestion and egestion of unused food as feces may contribute to reduced growth displayed at high food concentrations.