ego ideal


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ego ideal

[¦ē‚gō ī′dēl]
(psychology)
The part of an individual's personality that is composed of the aims and goals for the self and that usually refers to the conscious or unconscious emulation of significant people with whom the individual has identified.
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Zizek attaches this father to "an Otherness" (Ticklish Subject 314) that is not the Other of the Imaginary or Symbolic, not the father as either Imaginary ideal ego or Symbolic ego ideal.
Although Freud uses three distinct terms for the agency that pushes the subject to act ethically--he speaks of the ideal ego (Idealich), ego ideal (Ich-Ideal), and superego (Uberich)--as a rule he conflated the three (he often uses the expression Ichideal oder Idealich (ego ideal or ideal ego), and the title of chapter III of The Ego and the Id is "The Ego and Superego (Ego Ideal).
But the child also loves and admires his parents, and he similarly gives himself an inner object of love and admiration, the ego ideal.
The ego ideal provides the normative background against which the superego can be conceived as having authority.
In intrapsychic discourse, the process of unfavorable comparisons of the self to the ego ideal leads to a feedback cycle of self-disapproval, a sort of 'spiral of shame'.
Freud declares that this occurs through the process of identification whereby the current ego ideal is set aside and substituted by "the group ideal as embodied in the leader" (Freud, 1921/1985, p.
If a gap exists between the ego ideal and the self-image, the lower self-esteem can result in hostility; rage can develop toward others or as an attack on self in the form of self-defeat and self-destruction.
The chapter is organized around identity formation, the development of an ego ideal, and character formation and concludes with an interesting discussion of intersubjectivity.
Finally, we point to some of the political implications of the way that Zizek speculatively resolves his logical difficulties, by analysing the consequences of his claim that generalised social perversion--the problem to be solved--involves a dethroning of the communal ego ideal.
Early socialization contributes to her understanding of what roles are reinforcing and suitable, leading, in psychoanalytic terminology, to the development of the ego ideal.
This ego ideal remains always an unrealized and elusive potential, and thus a source of frustrated primal yearning.
Typically, in a democratic society students are able to build their own effective bridge from ego-status to ego-ideal, and where ego ideals are developed and fabricated based on the general acceptance of peers.