egocasting

egocasting

(1) Pursuing individual enjoyment, such as listening to a music channel that delivers selected songs to match one's own taste.

(2) Publishing a personal blog or Web page in order to broadcast one's own attributes and qualities. See egosurfing.
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Mid-year projections suggest that by the end of 2011, over 2 million subscribers will have forgone cable subscriptions in favor of in favor of cheaper, egocasting alternatives such as Hulu and Netflix (Svensson, 2010).
Rosen writes of the mirror as the very model of an egocasting technology, providing its user with a readily available image of him- or herself and encouraging self-consciousness and introspection.
08 (Time Capsule), 2008, whose central element was the HUQQUH (pronounced "hookah"), a media console into which you could plug any one of your egocasting technologies--from cell phone and camera to iPod--and have a file randomly uploaded to its digital time capsule (to be opened in 2030), information originally intended for personal use become part of a collective record of the moment, in a gift to the near future.
Sustenta Cadima que << a migracao do broadcasting para o << egocasting >>, isto e, para a edicao e << difusao >> de fragmentos de historias individuais, de reportagens de << jornalistascidadaos >>, de fotografia movel, de arquivo << web >>, de video domestico -do mais ao menos narcisico-, de blogs e vblogs, pela procura de conteudos diversissimos facilitados pelas novas capacidades de camaras integradas nos telemoveis, etc.
If the articles on egocasting reminded me of articles on aliteracy,
defense of the iPod and egocasting painted a rather different picture of
Notwithstanding this quote, the term Egocasting was used for the first time by the historian Christine Rosen in an essay entitled "The age of Egocasting".
This new environment to which the TV industry is now having to adapt is the world of Egocasting, centred chiefly around Internet that will end up being characterised by a culture of hyper-personalisation of media consumption, and by mass media's shrinking prominence in the time we devote to entertainment.
Morris (2009) argues that case with empirical data about TDS, and Rosen (2005) makes a larger point--that the "age of egocasting," often on display in popular entertainment texts, leads to a "fetishization," a "vast cultural impatience," and, ultimately, to "the triumph of individual choice over all critical standards" (p.
Ademas, se describen las fases que ha seguido la television hasta llegar a su personalizacion actual o egocasting.
These are heady times for the TV industry: growing use of IPTV, the development of VoD services, the advent of TV services distributed over the web in P2P mode, the growing phenomena of video podcasting and user-generated video content, the inevitable success of PVRs and PC Media Centres, not to mention the upcoming launch of commercial mobile TV offers in Europe using the DVB-H standardC* Is television entering into the egocasting era faster than we anticipated?