electron accelerator


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electron accelerator

[i′lek‚trän ak′sel·ə‚rād·ər]
(nucleonics)
A device which accelerates electrons to high energies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, he adds, the potential of 1,000-fold shrinkage for electron accelerators could open the way for a new generation of affordable, miniaturized accelerators.
Established in 1962, SLAC has won numerous awards including three Nobel prizes in physics while pursuing its mission to design, construct and operate state-of-the-art electron accelerators and related experimental facilities for high-energy physics and synchrotron radiation research.
These findings have encouraged the Michigan team to design an all-optical laser electron accelerator.
At the MAMI electron accelerator at the University of Mainz in Germany, researchers use electron beams of 855 megaelectronvolts to produce gamma rays for investigating proton polarization and related phenomena.
Whereas most high-powered electron accelerators hurl "pulses' of electrons, all bunched together, toward the target nucleus, CEBAF is designed to shoot the electrons in a single-file stream.
In addition, high-power electron accelerators to provide the expensive free electrons already exist -- the one at Los Alamos, for example, yields a megawatt of power.
the future European XFEL facility (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) to be located in Hamburg is based on the architecture of a linear electron accelerator with the integration of the accelerator section is performed by the CEA in Saclay .
Up the downsize Scientists made a key advance in laser-powered electron acceleration may lead to the shrinkage of today's stadium-scale electron accelerators to mere room-size devices (166: 212).
Contracted and funded by the United States Department of Energy, SLAC's mission is to design, construct and operate state-of-the-art electron accelerators and related experimental facilities for use in high-energy physics, astrophysics and synchroton radiation research.
It highlights many of the gaps where irradiation research is needed, including investigations into the use of electron accelerators for irradiating free-flowing bulk items, such as grain, and improvements in the methods for determining radiation dose.
Electron accelerators are being used to process an increasing array of industrial materials.
The findings confirm that, at high Mach numbers like those of the shocks surrounding supernova remnants, quasi-parallel shocks can become considerably more effective electron accelerators than previously thought.