electronic listening device

electronic listening device

[i‚lek′trän·ik ′lis·niŋ di‚vīs]
(electronics)
A device used to capture the sound waves of conversation originating in an ostensibly private setting in a form, usually as a magnetic tape recording, which can be used against the target by adverse interests.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Henry Hughes, representing Theobold, asked the detective about an electronic listening device that was covertly installed in Knight's car.
A cochlear implant is an electronic listening device that is surgically implanted in the cochlea (i.
The electronic listening device was hidden in a table at Woodhill prison in Milton Keynes and picked up conversations between the two in 2005 and 2006 about the latest developments in the US extradition request, the newspaper said.
Last April UC24 chiefs revealed that, following an electronic sweep of their Wavertree offices by a specialist surveillance company, an electronic listening device was recovered from the back of one of their computer screens.
Last month, Kidman won temporary restraining orders against Jamie Fawcett, 43, and Ben McDonald, 32, for allegedly stalking her and planting an electronic listening device outside her Sydney home.
Complete leak detection packages include a Pressure Testing Kit, Electronic Listening Device, Tankless Dive Unit, and the popular LeakTrac 2200 Vinyl Liner Leak Detector.
Authority for the inquiry, which is thought to have involved an electronic listening device placed in the officer's car, is believed to have been authorised 'at the highest levels' of West Midlands Police.
Urgent Care 24 (UC24) chiefs have revealed that, following an electronic sweep of their Wavertree offices by a specialist surveillance company, an electronic listening device was recovered from the back of one of their computer screens.
Complete leak detection packages include a Pressure Testing Kit, Electronic Listening Device Tankless Dive Unit, and the popular LeakTrac 2200 Vinyl Liner Leak Detector.
Members of the network used "burner" telephones - which they used and disposed of - and anti-surveillance devices to check for electronic listening devices or trackers on their cars.
In combat conditions, electronic listening devices would be drowned out by the fire and explosions of battle and, in the confusion of war, enemy troops would be hard to intercept as they moved in and out the tunnels.

Full browser ?