Eloquence

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Eloquence

Ambrose, St.
bees, prophetic of fluency, landed in his mouth. [Christian Hagiog: Brewster, 177]
Antony, Mark
gives famous speech against Caesar’s assassins. [Br. Lit.: Julius Caesar]
Arnall, Father
his sermons fill Stephen with the fear of hell-fire. [Br. Lit.: Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man]
bees on the mouth
pictorial and verbal symbol of eloquence. [Folklore and Christian Iconog.: Brewster, 177]
Bragi
god of poetry and fluent oration. [Norse Myth.: LLEI, I: 324]
Calliope
chief muse of poetic inspiration and oratory. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 177]
Churchill, Winston
(1874–1965) statesman whose rousing oratory led the British in WWII. [Br. Hist.: NCE, 556]
Cicero
(106–43 B. C.) orator whose forcefulness of presentation and melodious language is still imitated. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 558]
Demosthenes
(382–322 B.C.) generally considered the greatest of the Greek orators. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 559]
Gettysburg Address
Lincoln’s brief, moving eulogy for war dead (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
King, Martin Luther, Jr
. (1929–1968) civil rights leader and clergyman whose pleas for justice won support of millions. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1134]
lotus
symbol of eloquence. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Mapple, Father
preaches movingly and ominously on Jonah. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
Paine, Thomas
(1737–1809) powerful voice of the colonies; wrote famous “Common Sense.” [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 369–370]
Webster, Daniel
(1782–1852) noted 19th-century American orator-politician. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 539]
References in classic literature ?
But, Grandfather," asked Lawrence, "were there no able and eloquent men in this country who took the part of King George?
The life and adventures of our charming young clergyman, bear eloquent testimony to the saintly patience of his disposition, under trials which would have overwhelmed an ordinary man.
I can't thank you enough," she said, with an eloquent little choke in her voice.
It is eloquent with Ruskin's enthusiastic admiration for Beauty and with his magnificent romantic rhetoric (largely the result, according to his own testimony, of his mother's exacting drill in the Bible), which here and elsewhere make him one of the greatest of all masters of gorgeous description and of fervid exhortation.
Because a true and natural man contains and is the same truth which an eloquent man articulates; but in the eloquent man, because he can articulate it, it seems something the less to reside, and he turns to these silent beautiful with the more inclination and respect.
The tableau was pretty, but the pose and juxtaposition were too eloquent and evident to require explanation.
Other singers are there, to be sure, to whom only the full house maketh the voice soft, the hand eloquent, the eye expressive, the heart wakeful:-- those do I not resemble.
Every quiver of his little brown body, and every glance from his beseeching brown eyes were eloquent with appeal--so eloquent that at last Pollyanna understood, turned, and followed him.
Sedley was going to make one of the most eloquent speeches possible, and had begun--"O Miss Sharp, how--" when some song which was performed in the other room came to an end, and caused him to hear his own voice so distinctly that he stopped, blushed, and blew his nose in great agitation.
But though he was taking a holiday now, that is to say, he was doing no writing, he was so used to intellectual activity that he liked to put into concise and eloquent shape the ideas that occurred to him, and liked to have someone to listen to him.
Saxon raised the stick as if to strike him, and he suddenly abandoned the bone, rolled over on his back at her feet, four legs in the air, his ears lying meekly back, his eyes swimming and eloquent with submission and appeal.
The eloquent Pickwick, with one hand gracefully concealed behind his coat tails, and the other waving in air to assist his glowing declamation; his elevated position revealing those tights and gaiters, which, had they clothed an ordinary man, might have passed without observation, but which, when Pickwick clothed them--if we may use the expression--inspired involuntary awe and respect; surrounded by the men who had volunteered to share the perils of his travels, and who were destined to participate in the glories of his discoveries.