Eloquence

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Eloquence

Ambrose, St.
bees, prophetic of fluency, landed in his mouth. [Christian Hagiog: Brewster, 177]
Antony, Mark
gives famous speech against Caesar’s assassins. [Br. Lit.: Julius Caesar]
Arnall, Father
his sermons fill Stephen with the fear of hell-fire. [Br. Lit.: Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man]
bees on the mouth
pictorial and verbal symbol of eloquence. [Folklore and Christian Iconog.: Brewster, 177]
Bragi
god of poetry and fluent oration. [Norse Myth.: LLEI, I: 324]
Calliope
chief muse of poetic inspiration and oratory. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 177]
Churchill, Winston
(1874–1965) statesman whose rousing oratory led the British in WWII. [Br. Hist.: NCE, 556]
Cicero
(106–43 B. C.) orator whose forcefulness of presentation and melodious language is still imitated. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 558]
Demosthenes
(382–322 B.C.) generally considered the greatest of the Greek orators. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 559]
Gettysburg Address
Lincoln’s brief, moving eulogy for war dead (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
King, Martin Luther, Jr
. (1929–1968) civil rights leader and clergyman whose pleas for justice won support of millions. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1134]
lotus
symbol of eloquence. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Mapple, Father
preaches movingly and ominously on Jonah. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
Paine, Thomas
(1737–1809) powerful voice of the colonies; wrote famous “Common Sense.” [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 369–370]
Webster, Daniel
(1782–1852) noted 19th-century American orator-politician. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 539]
References in periodicals archive ?
IF PRESIDENT Bush's re-election demonstrated wide support for his "forward strategy of freedom"--the aggressive region-building scheme embodied in the Iraq war--you never would have known it from the people who took that strategy most seriously and argued most eloquently for it.
Kushner, for finally putting so eloquently into words what I feel and have thought (along with millions of other Americans) for the past four years
She eloquently discusses the need for rejuvenation by using the example of Sundays as a day of rest.
In his must-read book, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line: The Marketing of Higher Education, published earlier this year, Kirp eloquently summarized our challenge as university businesspeople and marketers: to find a way to reconcile the "values of the marketplace" with the "values of the commons.
Omen was speechless; his choices here are remarkably even-handed, an everyday camouflage concealing wondrous absurdities that summoned his familiars, including: a fascinating theme of puppetry in which the propetier examined a fair sight far more imaginable than most material eloquently dropped by the ever-so-popular temperariousness of the awkwardly committed.
Also, the letter from the young girl working in JobCentre Plus who can't afford driving lessons: how eloquently she expresses her opinion.
So here's a call to long-term care facilities in general and assisted living in particular, echoing a plea so eloquently stated in this magazine by Paul Willging in his column "With 'Aging in Place,' Honesty Pays" (May 2004, p.
Luna speaks so eloquently that her words are like poems within the book.
Arnold Schwarzenegger; Don Soderquist, retired vice chairman at Wal-Mart, who spoke eloquently about ethics and how they intersect with leadership; John Connors, CFO of Microsoft Corp.
Overall, Black eloquently offers some heartfelt and seemingly reasonable solutions to sustaining healthy waterways.
Marie Harker on John Knox's notoriously misogynist 1588 text, The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women and David Parkinson's eloquently written exploration of metanarratives of reception.
Aarim-Heriot writes carefully and eloquently in defense of the rights of racialized peoples and succeeds at times in showing how knowing their stories change the overall political history of the U.