embayment

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embayment

[em′bā·mənt]
(geography)
Indentation in a shoreline forming a bay.
(geology)
Act or process of forming a bay.
A reentrant of sedimentary rock into a crystalline massif.
References in periodicals archive ?
All fish collections were done using daytime, pulsed direct-current electrofishing (5-8 A, 180-220 V) at four transects with 15 min of effort each in a single embayment that was sampled each year.
During this interval erosion continued at a low rate at bold scarps in the embayment near Chestle Pill (Fig.
Moreton Bay is a large, shallow, subtropical, semi-enclosed triangular embayment formed between the large sand islands of Stradbroke and Moreton Islands and the mainland coastline of Australia (Figure 1).
Winter distribution of brant on the Alaska Peninsula is largely confined to four embayments (Dau and Ward, 1997): Izembek Lagoon, Kinzarof Lagoon, Big Lagoon in northern Morzhovoi Bay, and northern Bechevin Bay (including Hook Bay and St.
Atilla N and Fleeger JW: Meiofaunal colonization of artificial substrates in an estuarine embayment.
These clays are sedimentary and were deposited in the large Mississippi embayment which covered the area in Paleocene time (Thomas and Murray, 1989).
2001) also provide models to explain the infilling of east coast estuarine embayments with their sand-barrier-induced, inner mud basins where sulfidic sediments accumulated initially, later to be overtopped by fluviatilc sediment.
Local topography (Figure 2b) controls the position of cliffs and headlands; sediment deposits in embayments result in a coastline that is straighter than the outline of the mainland.
The relief sharpens daily, and soon the channels and embayments make deep, reed-walled canyons.
The algae poses an immediate threat to the coastal embayments where it has been found, including California's Agua Hedionda Lagoon and Huntington Harbor," says Chiara Clemente, an environmental specialist with California's Regional Water Quality Control Board.
Spits and beach ridges continued to grow until the end of the 19th century, which resulted in (1) capturing small embayments of Lake Michigan to form Calumet and Wolf Lakes, and (2) further deflecting of the Grand Calumet River eastward.