Emboss

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Emboss

To raise or indent a pattern on the surface of a material; sometimes produced by the use of patterned rollers.

emboss

To raise or indent a pattern on the surface of a material; sometimes produced by the use of patterned rollers.
References in periodicals archive ?
i] is the measured depth of embossed plates, and n is the number of measurements.
This is expected because, once the small channel is embossed, the contact area between the mold and the substrate surface increases substantially.
Various processing parameters were studied in terms of their influence on the replicability of IR-assisted embossed plates: roller temperature, embossing pressure, and rolling speed.
Though there are a few films that can be embossed, most film substrates have a shape memory, so the embossed image will disappear as the film returns to its original state of flatness.
The multi-level embossed pattern is inspired by Mediterranean beaches and perfectly complements the flask-like fragrance bottle, housed in handwoven rattan.
The polymer fiber sheet is surface embossed on at least one major surface with a predetermined raised pattern to provide a fiber sheet with a raised, distinct embossed surface pattern with upper and lower areas and enhanced dimensional stability.
6 /PRNewswire/ -- Mead Johnson Nutritionals is asking parents in southern California who feed their babies Nutramigen(R) Powder infant formula to check that the letters NUTRAM are embossed on the bottom of the can.
Cards come in any denomination from $5 up to $1,000 and can be branded with your company logo, embossed with their name and your own custom message.
The multi-level embossed dimpled golf ball pattern (on the lid) reinforces the Michael Jordan brand as the ultimate in sport and style.
The initial experimental results indicated that the thickness uniformity of embossed shell patterns is sensitive to the process conditions and materials selection.
A new helically cut, cross-laminated HDPE film from Ole-Bendt Rasmussen, inventor of tear-proof Valeron films in the 1950s, starts out as blown film that is slit into layflat and longitudinally stretched and embossed with intermeshing grooved rollers that leave thin parallel lines.