dependence

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dependence

[di′pen·dəns]
(medicine)
Habituation to, abuse of, or addiction to a substance.
(statistics)
The existence of a relationship between frequencies obtained from two parts of an experiment which does not arise from the direct influence of the result of the first part on the chances of the second part but indirectly from the fact that both parts are subject to influences from a common outside factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
25) Putting the point bluntly: the notion of emotional dependence used by the majority is simply too slippery.
This scale distinguishes between Emotional Dependence (ER) and Instrumental Dependence (LS) and consists of 16 questions in the ER subscale and 13 questions in the LS subscale, which respondents answer on a four-point scale.
Being able to free oneself from excessive emotional dependence on parents accompanies better mental health in adolescent boys and girls.
Some critics see Glaspell's feminist writing as being at odds with her romantic relationships, particularly with her husband "Jig" Cook, a purveyor of wild schemes, financial and emotional dependence, infidelity and alcoholism.
As fears for her own fulfillment grow, so does her emotional dependence on her frustrated beau.
Addiction is a psychological or emotional dependence on feeling high.
For many women there is an emotional dependence on smoking.
Although a few married couples made important contributions to the New Thought Movement, many women found that the single life better enabled them to pursue careers as New Thought practitioners by breaking their financial and emotional dependence on men and freeing them from relationships based on sexual desire.
Chapter V is concerned with the positive emotional dependence of a married couple on their sexual relationship, contradicting the opinion that, before 1600, love and sexuality were kept separate by theologians.
Barthes is terrific as the younger Pam, radiating a natural joy which makes her mother's emotional dependence on her totally plausible; but the character's transformation to a moody, embittered older girl feels forced.
Emotional dependence is another reason victims stay with batterers.