empirical


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Related to empirical: Empirical probability

empirical

1. (of medical treatment) based on practical experience rather than scientific proof
2. Philosophy
a. (of knowledge) derived from experience rather than by logic from first principles
b. (of a proposition) subject, at least theoretically, to verification
3. of or relating to medical quackery

empirical

  1. derived from systematic observation or experiment, as against speculative assertion or merely theoretical knowledge.
  2. factually true but, as yet, theoretically unexplained. See also EMPIRICISM, ABSTRACTED EMPIRICISM, EMPIRICAL SOCIOLOGY.

empirical

[em′pir·ə·kəl]
(science and technology)
Based on actual measurement, observation, or experience, rather than on theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Empirical Data LLC brings its vast networking and telephony knowledge to the Total Tec Solutions Support table.
Discourse is the form in which knowledge appears as empirical and social phenomenon.
substantially dependent on empirical considerations that no originalist
I believe it is because few banks have taken the steps necessary to ensure that the "customer conversation" is empirical.
This twelve-chapter book is an extraordinarily valuable addition to a handful of books that can be used to learn or teach empirical research methodology in the humanities.
An immunologist and cell and molecular biologist working for a biotechnology company in Massachusetts, Dunn compares different modes of molecular discovery, emphasizing the historical and ongoing importance of empirical strategies without denying the value of rational methods.
If it is to speak to such questions--if it is to be a practical discourse--International Relations needs to be more than an explanatory project; it has to occupy the difficult terrain between empirical and normative inquiry.
Empirical pluralism is intended to be a 'substantial and consistent form of pluralism' (xiii), and support for it is thought to derive collectively from the various case studies found among the essays in the book (although the authors of these essays may not themselves advocate empirical pluralism).
This article examines how the Internet has changed the work of academic researchers and addresses the question of how expanded Internet usage has affected Journal of Risk and Insurance (JRI) and Journal of Finance (JF) articles, including the shift to empirical research, joint authorship, and new authorship.
Such questions point to a tension in critical care practice: whereas staff and patients may be aware of the importance of creating healing environments, they nevertheless find themselves in a culture in which an empirical approach to disease--one that focuses primarily on measurable, predetermined outcomes--is the standard.
This is not to minimize the essential contribution of university faculty, who collectively bring a wealth of knowledge about critical issues facing school counseling and the research skills to provide the type of empirical data necessary to make sense of the issues.
It makes sense, therefore, to adopt separate national and state policies for those under eighteen, but only so long as the validation for doing so rests on reason and empirical evidence and not on purely dogmatic notions of morality.