Endocardium

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endocardium

[‚en·dō′kärd·ē·əm]
(anatomy)
The membrane lining the heart.

Endocardium

 

the endothelial lining membrane of the heart, folds of which form the cardiac valves. Inflammation of the endocardium is called endocarditis.

References in periodicals archive ?
Commonly, the surgical portion of the hybrid approach is prior to the transvenous portion in a staged approach, thereby, in principle, allowing the electrophysiologist to confirm epicardial linear lesions and pulmonary vein isolation (PVI); in addition to decreasing the burden of additional endocardial lesion sets needed to be applied by the electrophysiologist to achieve procedural end-points.
Endocardial RV mapping and ablation of the VT were attempted but were unsuccessful due to anatomic limitations and challenges reaching the inferior RV aneurysm.
Endocardial endothelium may be exposed to the turbulent blood flow, but this type of flow does not increase eNOS activity or NO release.
0 cm CVRL, the ventricle was partitioned by the interventricular septum extended upward from the ventral side of heart toward the endocardial cushions leaving an opening in the interventricular foramen (Figure 3).
As a result, physicians prefer endocardial LAA closure to epicardial LAA closure, as they are more familiar with the technology, safety, and effectiveness," says Messenger.
Only a hand very practised at anatomical dissection could have cut such a uniform transverse section from human heart tissue, showing various veins and arteries of different cross-sections, and the endocardial membrane.
Other associations include MURCS (aplasia of the mullerian duct, unilateral renal agenesis, anomalies of the cervicothoracic somites) and CHARGE (coloboma [a defect of ocular tissue], hearing deficit, choanal atresia, retarded growth and/or development, genital hypoplasia [males only], and endocardial cushion defect [a spectrum of septal defects resulting from imperfect fusion of the endocardial cushions and ranging from persistent ostium primum to persistent complete common atrioventricular canal]).
Though our results with endocardial catheters have effectively demonstrated the efficacy of intracatheter needle injection in the heart, the technique requires considerable skill and some very expensive equipment.
We also saw significant evidence of increase in endocardial flow, both at rest and when the heart was under stress.
The left ventricle was cut circumferentially into eight samples, each divided into epicardial and endocardial parts (9).