Endorsement

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Endorsement

 

a transfer signature, that is, a signature written on the back of a draft, check, bill of lading, or some other type of security to establish transfer of legal title of these documents from one person (the endorser) to another. The endorsement may be a full endorsement, that is, an endorsement to the order of a person (indicating to whom or to whose order the document is transferred), or a blank endorsement (to bearer). The endorsement on a draft or check makes the endorser liable for the amount indicated on the document.

References in periodicals archive ?
In Monday's edition, we'll carry excerpts from newspaper endorsements, as well as a diverse range of reader letters regarding the governor's race.
Although endorsements mostly mirror the political stance of the corresponding newspapers, and are therefore expected, unexpected endorsements may come as (1) a surprise, when a newspaper traditionally endorsing one party goes for another party; equally, they may appear as (2) inconsistent, when they are at odds with the newspaper's typical discourse (political language).
Therefore, claims professionals should check whether there other DMV-67 endorsements that were never cancelled and may still be at play.
Endorsements include the traditional paid celebrity, but further include reviews by consumers or bloggers, product demonstrations, and even product mentions in social media.
Roozen and Claeys, 2010) Endorsements by celebrities may supply information crosscuts that can indicate the relevance of a candidate to electors at little or no expense (a celebrity endorsement may enhance overall elector involvement).
As he says, "The Higher Education Endorsement Program was created to address the concern that many schools are failing to adequately prepare their students for their lifelong careers.
First things first: FINRA and SEC guidelines state that endorsements are fine as long as they do not come from a client and are not related to financial services or your ability to manage money.
Bush, who won 59 percent of newspaper endorsements during his 2000 campaign.
Louis Post-Dispatch are cutting back on endorsements.
Endorsements for the Democratic candidate from left-leaning newspapers are less influential than endorsements from neutral or right-leaning newspapers and likewise for endorsements from papers sympathetic to Republican candidates.
These endorsements add individuals and/or organizations as insureds to the named insured's policy.