endothermy


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endothermy

[′en·dō‚thər·mē]
(physiology)
The utilization of metabolic heat for thermoregulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadly, endothermy was much more common in terrestrial systems, and endotherms assumed lower trophic positions (namely, herbivory), both of which were negatively correlated with MFCL.
Vertebrate endothermy restricts most fungi as potential pathogens.
Dickson and Graham (2004) argued that endothermy per se was not required for niche expansion and that other adaptations were necessary to allow for vertical movements below the thermocline.
Grade Degree of removal I Macroscopically complete removal with excision of dural attachment and abnormal bone (including sinus resection when involved) II Macroscopically complete with endothermy coagulation (Bovie, or laser) of dural attachment III Macroscopically complete without resection or coagulation of dural attachment or of its extradural extensions (e.
Once SRY evolved, endothermy could also evolve since both males and females could develop at the same temperature.
While most sharks have body temperatures equal to that of the surrounding seawater, great white sharks exhibit regional endothermy, enabling them to maintain a higher body temperature than that of the seawater because of a heat-retaining system.
OCULAR MUSCLES AS A HEAT SOURCE FOR CRANIAL ENDOTHERMY IN THE SHORTFIN MAKO SHARK, ISURUS OXYRINCHUS
First, the abundance of predator/prey ratio does not fit with the Eltonian Pyramid of Shotwell (1) or the predator/prey ratio for endothermy in Bakker (5).
Hence, large body mass is critical for effective insect endothermy, especially prolonged flight on cold days, and that is why insect heterotherms tend to be large (Heinrich 1981, 1993).
Climate variability and the energetic pathways of evolution: the origin of endothermy in mammals and birds.
Origin and evolution of sleep: roles of vision and endothermy.