epiphyseal plate


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epiphyseal plate

[ə¦pif·ə¦sē·əl ′plāt]
(anatomy)
The broad, articular surface on each end of a vertebral centrum.
The thin layer of cartilage between the epiphysis and the shaft of a long bone. Also known as metaphysis.
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Conclusion: Indiscriminate iron supplementation to the rats throughout pregnancy without checking serum iron levels can disturb the longitudinal growth of epiphyseal plate of femur.
Growth in height is driven by elongation of long bones due to chondrogenesis at the epiphyseal plates, also known as the growth plate.
In this way, the cartilage in the epiphyseal plate is gradually replaced by new bone.
Structurally, the shape of the epiphyseal plate produces an interlocking of the physis and metaphysis of the plate.
The width at the distal end was also measured at the widest point, but the precise location varied; in some, it was very close to the end at the lateral and medial edges of the corresponding articular condyles, and in others it was proximal to the condyles, in the approximate location of the epiphyseal plate (Fig.
There is decreased rate of longitudinal growth of long bones and enlargement of ends of long bones due to effects of weight causing flaring of diphysis adjacent to epiphyseal plate (Radostits et al.
Nolan said that the number of ribs and epiphyseal plate densities remain a riddle; while he is open to the foetus hypothesis, he thinks that the jury is still out.
The disease may affect epiphyseal plate and metephysis, resulting in the secondary changes of acetabulum.
3) However, because UBCs almost exclusively affect skeletal areas associated with the most rapid longitudinal growth and originate near or in contact with the epiphyseal plate, a local growth aberration is most likely.
There is a distinct possibility that, during certain times in some children's growth phases, the tension across the epiphyseal plate may be released in a manner similar to a microscopic "earthquake", placing increasing tension on the periosteum, thereby triggering the firing of the pain receptors that reside in this tissue.
1978) Traumatic avulsion of the finger nail associated with injury to the phalangeal epiphyseal plate.