episode


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episode

1. an incident, sequence, or scene that forms part of a narrative but may be a digression from the main story
2. (in ancient Greek tragedy) a section between two choric songs
3. Music a contrasting section between statements of the subject, as in a fugue or rondo

episode

any ‘historically located sequence of change’ (e.g. the origins of PRISTINE STATES) with ‘a specific opening, trend of events and outcome’, but not a part of any necessary sequence of social development (GIDDENS, 1981). see also EPISODIC CHARACTERIZATION.

episode

[′ep·ə‚sōd]
(geology)
A distinctive event or series of events in the geologic history of a region or feature.
References in classic literature ?
But the Epanchins had not had time to get more than twenty paces away when a scandalous episode occurred.
Music herself, the analysis of the musical soul, in the characteristic episodes of its development is a wholly new range of poetic subject in which Mr.
The sisters were alike as little girls, but at the time of the Wilcox episode their methods were beginning to diverge; the younger was rather apt to entice people, and, in enticing them, to be herself enticed; the elder went straight ahead, and accepted an occasional failure as part of the game.
An episode of humour or kindness touches and amuses him here and there--a pretty child looking at a gingerbread stall; a pretty girl blushing whilst her lover talks to her and chooses her fairing; poor Tom Fool, yonder behind the waggon, mumbling his bone with the honest family which lives by his tumbling; but the general impression is one more melancholy than mirthful.
The episode of the elections served as a good occasion for a capital dinner.
The minister related many a touching incident in the lives of the departed, too, which illustrated their sweet, generous natures, and the people could easily see, now, how noble and beautiful those episodes were, and remembered with grief that at the time they occurred they had seemed rank rascalities, well deserving of the cowhide.
It is stated, they say, in the true original of this history, that when Cide Hamete came to write this chapter, his interpreter did not translate it as he wrote it- that is, as a kind of complaint the Moor made against himself for having taken in hand a story so dry and of so little variety as this of Don Quixote, for he found himself forced to speak perpetually of him and Sancho, without venturing to indulge in digressions and episodes more serious and more interesting.
IT is no part of mine to narrate the adventures of John Nicholson, which were many, but simply his more momentous misadventures, which were more than he desired, and, by human standards, more than he deserved; how he reached California, how he was rooked, and robbed, and beaten, and starved; how he was at last taken up by charitable folk, restored to some degree of self-complacency, and installed as a clerk in a bank in San Francisco, it would take too long to tell; nor in these episodes were there any marks of the peculiar Nicholsonic destiny, for they were just such matters as befell some thousands of other young adventurers in the same days and places.
But this was not until some episodes with baby were over, and had left her mind at leisure.
I went at it very simply, and my enjoyment of it was that sort which finds its account in the fine passages, the brilliant episodes, the striking pictures.
Backward beyond the beginning of this via dolorosa--this epic of suffering with episodes of sin--I see nothing clearly; it comes out of a cloud.
It is not surprising, therefore, to find that from the first the Boeotian school is forced to season its matter with romantic episodes, and that later it tends more and more to revert (as in the "Shield of Heracles") to the Homeric tradition.