epistolary


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epistolary

(archaic), epistolatory
(of a novel or other work) constructed in the form of a series of letters
References in periodicals archive ?
In the introduction to her book, Richter situates the study of early medieval Chinese epistolary culture in the context of world literature.
The argument is convincing but the concluding paragraph of Postal Culture (160) adds one question to the topic of Italian illiteracy rates that remains unanswered: who were "the significant number of Italian readers" of epistolary novels who also read "foreign novels in translation" (p.
Jan Fergus has argued that Lady Susan bears a strong thematic link to Maria Edgeworth's epistolary novel Leonora, a critique of the culture of sensibility that anticipates the concerns of Sense and Sensibility.
Warren's epistolary brethren were to a man scholars who sought to mediate the insights of aesthetic expression for the benefit of culture and human society.
Beyond that, there was the disappointing fact that no actual correspondence by Shakespeare survives, making his own engagement in epistolary culture seem a non-starter as a route into reading epistles in his plays.
The first half of Authors of Their Lives deserves to become mandatory reading for any scholar entering the field of epistolary studies.
Ray's alternative history of sixteenth-/seventeenth-century female vernacular epistolary nuances and challenges our understanding of gender performance during the time period in which Italian female letters flourished.
Written as an epistolary novel, The Lacuna is the story of a man's quest for identity amid the turbulent political setting of 1950s Mexico and the United States.
Brock has created an epistolary biography of Hunter.
Her analysis of the letters and related documents provides a portrait of a Renaissance marriage, an insight into the diplomatic networks founded on princely marriage alliance, and a theoretical exploration of epistolary communication made possible by this unusually rich trove.
This moving epistolary novel starts in the winter of 1946, just after the end of WW II in a stark London, barely recovering.
Ever restless with inherited forms, Schulze boldly reconceives the epistolary novel: we are given the collected letters of Heinrich Turmer, an East German dramaturge/novelist turned newspaper magnate, letters directed to three distinctly different outlets, each allegorically suggestive: a beloved sister, a lifelong unrequited love, and a childhood friend.