equivalent altitude

equivalent altitude

An altitude that would supply the same amount of oxygen to the respiratory system as that provided in the pressurized cabin, through an oxygen mask, or the like. See also cabin attitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cabin is pressured to a lower equivalent altitude, which, according to Qatar Airways, means you can breathe in more oxygen than in any other aircraft, resulting in less travel fatigue and dizziness and fewer headaches.
Expressing the effects of reduced air density as an equivalent altitude is just an arcane aviation-centric way of discussing the physics so pilots can relate to it better.
I have climbed the equivalent altitude of Mount Everest five times without much rest.
Summarized the knowledge about the influence of intermittent hypoxia and here especially the optimal "profile" of equivalent altitude, duration of exposure, the number of exposures and the pause between them on acclimatization AMS, and other factors is not yet clear.
These enclosures create a normobaric environment with an equivalent altitude up to 30,000 feet, while completely removing the risks associated with a hypobaric environment such as sinus injuries and decompression sickness.
New aircraft utilize high-tech, carbon-fiber composite material in place of metals that allow cabin pressure to be set at an equivalent altitude as low as 2000 feet versus 8000 feet today.
Most commercial airline antennas operate pressurized with cabin air at typically 5000 feet equivalent altitude.