ergodic

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ergodic

[ər′gäd·ik]
(statistics)
Property of a system or process in which averages computed from a data sample over time converge, in a probabilistic sense, to ensemble or special averages.
Pertaining to such a system or process.
References in periodicals archive ?
The method allows determining not only the project management system ergodicity, but also the conditions of existence for return and non-return oriented graphs' structures.
In his book Taleb introduces the concept of Ergodicity which roughly means that under certain conditions very large sample paths end up resembling each other.
The signals recorded for each sampling point have been then transformed in the time domain so to work out an estimate of the coherence matrix under the hypothesis of ergodicity [30, 32].
Single particle tracking in systems showing anomalous diffusion: the role of weak ergodicity breaking.
Because of the ergodicity, regularity and pseudo-randomness of the chaotic sequences embedded in the CBPSO, the proposed algorithm in a hybrid of the chaos system can avoid entrapment in local optima.
Some new searching algorithms called Chaos Optimization Algorithms (COAs) use the properties of chaos like ergodicity as in Li (1998) and Zhang (1999).
It also keeps the gene pool well stocked, and thus ensuring ergodicity.
Algorithm Structure complexity complexity Confusion Ergodicity Table 2: Bit error rate performance of the two design models.
A] is already strongly consistent by assuming only the ergodicity of [[PHI].
The ergodicity property implies, then, that an ergodic process has, in its entirety, the same asymptotic properties, that is, it cannot be separated into parts and guarantees the uniqueness of the limits of the relative frequencies of the outcome E (35).
5) explores the implications of the ergodicity assumption for the ex post to ex ante dilemma facing modern financial economics.
The first notion, ergodicity, is important for conceptualising the actual effort or work that students put into enacting the computer game.