ethical indifference

ethical indifference

the doctrine that sociology, in its main research and theorizing, should no more occupy itself centrally with ethical concerns than should the natural sciences. This view has been taken recently, for example, by the ETHNOMETHODOLOGISTS, who have wanted to establish a new focus on careful ‘descriptions’ of the everyday social competence and social practices of members of society, and to do this free of any distracting requirement to ‘judge’ these practices. While, in part, this celebration of ‘ethical indifference’ rests on the aim of advancing the ‘empirical’ understanding of social action, it also derives from a view that sociology possesses no special basis on which to make value judgements which are not already possessed by the lay member of society The ‘social competence’ possessed by SOCIAL ACTORS is seen as establishing each actor as a ‘moral agent’. Compare VALUE FREEDOM AND VALUE NEUTRALITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Utility leaves no space for ethical indifference because a fact is useful or useless, so it could only be good or bad.
In this way, the analysis of consequence through strict implication saves consequentialism from Manichaeism, involving ethical indifference.
The climate of moral and ethical indifference on Beacon Hill made it possible for state Sen.
Here, as rarely in a fashion image, ethical indifference carries its own truth content.
Those who have nothing to defend indifferently affirm the supposed omnipotence of power and violence and it is against this background of aesthetic ornamentalism as well as ethical indifference that Kracauer discusses ethical law and committed art as elements that could have asserted themselves more strongly within German 'national culture' during the rise of Nazism.
The evidence of a culture of ethical indifference is increasingly difficult to ignore.