sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
Characteristically they arise from lateral nasal wall near the middle turbinate and extend into sinuses usually involving the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses.
22) The ethmoid sinuses are the most frequent source of infection.
X-ray PNS had low sensitivity (58%), specificity (53%) and accuracy (56%) for diagnosing chronic sinusitis because of the inadequate evaluation of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses and their overlapping anatomic structures (Table 3).
Ipsilateral ethmoid sinuses metastasis and proptosis: Rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer.
Similar to the study population overall, tumors with osteoblastoma-like features occurred most frequently in the frontal (59%) and ethmoid sinuses (44%).
1,2) These include: paranasal sinusitis, especially of the frontal sinuses (1-14) with the extension of infection from the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses being relatively uncommon; (2) osteomy-elitis of the skull, which can be associated rarely with Pott's Puffy Tumor; (3,4,5) direct extension from the middle ear, the mastoid, or the orbit; trauma resulting in skull fracture; iatrogenic causes like craniotomy, skull traction for cervical fractures or scalp venous catheters in the pediatric population; (6) and hematological spread from a remote focus of infection.
Since the ethmoid sinuses are near the tear ducts in the corner of the eyes, inflammation of these cavities often causes swelling of the eyelids and tissues around your eyes, and pain between your eyes.
The Entellus FinESS system treats the two most commonly inflamed sinuses, the maxillary and anterior ethmoid sinuses.
CT Scan reveals hyperdense mass filling left nasal cavity, maxillary, ethmoid sinuses and invading the roof of the orbit on the left side, involving the extraoccular muscles, pushing the left eyeball inferiorly.
These defects can now easily be accessed via endoscopic transnasal techniques, especially the cribriform plate, the roof of the ethmoid sinuses and the sphenoid sinus.
The ethmoid sinuses are closer to the nasal passages.
ETHMOID SINUS: The ethmoid sinuses begin to form in the third to fifth fetal months, when numerous separate evaginations arise from the nasal cavity.