euryhaline


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euryhaline

[¦yu̇r·ə¦ha‚līn]
(ecology)
Pertaining to the ability of marine organisms to tolerate a wide range of saline conditions, and therefore a wide variation of osmotic pressure, in the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adetognathus tolerates stressed euryhaline environmental conditions (Merrill and von Bitter, 1976) and is uncommonly abundant in this locality.
Sodium, chloride and water balance in the euryhaline teleost Aphanius dispar (Ruppell) (Cyprinodontidae).
Two types of chloride cells in the gill epithelium of a freshwater-adapted euryhaline fish: Lebistes reticulatus, their modifications during adaptation to saltwater.
Effects of low salinities on oxygen consumption of selected euryhaline and stenohaline freshwater fish.
Furthermore, it is possible that even if ships carrying the organisms flushed their ballast tanks with saline water, the euryhaline C.
These results suggest that mosquitofish are well adapted metabolically to euryhaline conditions; i.
EXCHANGER (NHE) PROTEIN IN THE GILLS OF A MARINE ELASMOBRANCH (SQUALUS ACANTHIAS) AND A EURYHALINE TELEOST (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS), Jill Weakley and James B.
26) reported severe inflammation and moderate atrophy of primary ducts and diverticula in the digestive gland of an euryhaline species of bivalve mollusk, the Asian clam (Potamocorbula amurensis), collected from Sacramento River of the San Francisco estuary in California, where high concentration of heavy metals were found.
The sector under review is among the fastest-growing sectors of the Greek economy, making Greece the largest producer country of Mediterranean euryhaline fish (sea bream and sea bass).
The bivalve Mytilus edulis is a euryhaline osmoconformer (Krogh 1939, Tedengren & Kautsky 1986) that occurs in environments ranging from full oceanic salinity (34) to mesohaline (5-18) estuarine conditions (Bayne 1976).
This indicates that the species is drastically affected by a sudden change in physico-chemical parameters, despite its euryhaline nature (Forbes & Hay 1988).