eusocial


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eusocial

[‚yü′sō·shəl]
(zoology)
Pertaining to animal societies, such as those of certain insects, in which sterile individuals work on behalf of reproductive individuals.
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Composed of eusocial mammals, the mole rat society is organized into hives dominated by queens, and the rivalry between queens has prevented a united mole rat uprising--until recently.
Among insect pollinators, eusocial bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae) like honey bees (Aizen & Harder 2009) and bumble bees (Hayo & Adriaan 2006) are key in crop pollination.
Dominance and queen succession in captive colonies of the eusocial naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber.
The 39 papers examine such topics as the present status and future promises of applying the infrared and Raman micro-spectroscopy of cells and tissue in medical diagnostics, antimicrobial peptide from the eusocial bee Halictus sexcinctus interacting with model membranes, studying the cellular uptake of modified oligonucleotides using time-resolved micro-spectro-fluorimetry and florescence imaging, protein-ligand interactions of the D-galactose/D-glucose-binding protein as a potential sensing probe of glucose biosensors, and the effect of bacterial adhesion on grafted chains revealed by non-invasive sum frequency generation spectroscopy.
Hymenoptera encompass a vast array of biological life-styles, including two truly remarkable diversifications within the insects: the largest development of eusocial taxa among the animals and the greatest elaboration of parasitic behavior among the insects (Whitfield, 1998).
En el presente estudio la diversidad de depredadores se considerada como un todo, porque, aparte de que Formicidae sea un grupo eusocial, cada individuo puede actuar como depredador de insectos (Hagen et al.
Eusocial can be defined in terms of animals and human beings living in multigenerational communities, practicing division of labour and behaving altruistically, ready to sacrifice at least some of their personal interests to that of the group".
This result should be important for future studies focused on eusocial evolution, as it suggests that morphology may not be a good indicator of evolutionary relatedness in these groups of organisms," he said.
In Sociobiology (1975), the book that brought him fame, Wilson identified four pinnacles of social evolution: the colonial invertebrates (such as the corals, the Portuguese man-of-war, and sponges), the eusocial insects (ants, bees, wasps, and termites), nonhuman mammals, and humans.
Nestmate recognition is paramount for the development and maintenance of colony cohesiveness in eusocial insects.