evolutionary rate

evolutionary rate

[‚ev·ə¦lü·shə‚ner·ē ′rāt]
(evolution)
The amount of evolutionary change per unit of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it is tempting to estimate the time of origin of this novel DENV-2, as performed for other divergent DENV lineages (7), we have not made this estimation because our data provided strong evidence for a marked difference in evolutionary rate between human and sylvatic strains of DENV-2, which will confound all attempts at molecular clock dating.
29], in this paper, we define the evolutionary rate as the variation rate of optimal fitness values between two successive iterations.
Evolutionary rate analyses of orthologs and paralogs from 12 Drosophila genomes.
For the second half, the book shifts to more complicated issues, evaluating the influence of recombination on selection estimates based on sequence alignment, the determinants of evolutionary rate for different types of proteins, and frameworks for understanding and studying the evolution of interacting proteins.
Newly reported evolutionary rate comparisons show that the cerebellum expanded up to six times faster than anticipated throughout the evolution of apes, including humans.
If they are interpreted at face value as representing real differences in molecular evolutionary rate, it is unclear in what manner (gradual or abrupt) and at what point subsequent to the divergence of their last common ancestor (immediately or more recently) such rate shift might have taken place (PIRIE and DOYLE, 2012).
Further work on collection and calculation of substitution rates in DEN-3 sequences of Indian origin from a longer time period is required to be undertaken to further verify and validate the high evolutionary rate of DEN-3 genotype-III in India.
Training data for each individual residue included the frequencies of each of the 20 standard amino acids in a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences and the evolutionary rate.
Rapid mutation of the virus strains was traced to a genome with an extremely high evolutionary rate.
The researchers found that island isolation per se does not really affect the evolutionary rate, the rates of diversification of species, or the rate at which body size shifts in populations of island and mainland animals.
The theory assumes that favorable mutations occur, but are sufficiently rare that they have little effect on the overall evolutionary rate of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions.

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