excision

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Related to excisions: surgically, major surgery, resect

excision

[ek′sizh·ən]
(genetics)
Recombination involving removal of a genetic element.
(medicine)
The cutting out of a part; removal of a foreign body or growth from a part, organ, or tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Excision and sending the excised material for frozen section control was performed once for 11 patients, twice for 12 patients, 3 times for 8 patients and 4 times for 4 patients to confirm that the surgical margins were clean.
Surgical removal of the lesion is necessary for the diagnosis and treatment and the complete excision of the lesion together with approximately 1 cm of healthy tissue is important to prevent local recurrence.
Practitioners who manage a high volume of lower genital tract disease and take care to minimize tissue excision and destruction at the time of treatment are likely those whose patients have the best obstetric outcomes following treatment for CIN.
Despite multiple previous excisions resulting in extensive scarring, there was no difficulty in finding the recipient nerve.
For scars greater than 3 mm, or scars with cutaneous bridges or persistent cysts and tunnels, he recommended elliptical excision.
Is surgical excision necessary for the management of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ diagnosed on core needle biopsy?
2) Numerous therapeutic modalities have been used to treat them, including intralesional steroid injection alone; surgical excision alone; surgical excision with skin grafting; surgery followed by radiation therapy; radiation therapy alone; systemic drug therapies, including vitamin E, penicillamine, colchicines, thiotepa, and tetrahydroxyquinone; massage; silicone gel sheeting; intralesional interferon; compression therapy; cryotherapy; laser excision; electrodessication; and topical medications such as 5-fluorouracil or bleomycin.
at the University of Miami, noted that radical Longhorn or triangular excisions have in recent years been replaced wherever possible by surgical techniques, such as separate groin excisions that spare the "skin bridge" between the groin and the vulva.
The only study on the topic, written 14 years ago when DCIS was not known to be as prevalent, recommended radiation treatment following an excision or lumpectomy.
The resulting new squamocolumnar junction was more proximally located (at os or endocervical) for women with loop excisions greater than 10 mm deep (P <.
In the study, intact lumpectomy specimens were sampled immediately following excision by applying the Dune probe to multiple measurement sites on each margin examined.