excited state


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Excited state

In quantum mechanics, a stationary state of higher energy than the lowest stationary state or ground state of a particle or a system of particles. Customarily, only bound stationary states, which generally are at most denumerably infinite in number, are spoken of as excited, although the formal quantum theory often treats the noncountable unbound stationary states on an equal footing with the bound states. See Ground state, Metastable state

excited state

See energy level; excitation.

excited state

[ek′sīd·əd ′stāt]
(quantum mechanics)
A stationary state of higher energy than the lowest stationary state or ground state of a particle or system of particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photodissociation of Molecules in Hydrogen Bonded Clusters Probing the Excited State (Michal Frnk, Petr Slavek and Udo Buck).
Siva's research group uses modern molecular tools and spectroscopic techniques to gain deeper understanding of molecular interactions in chemical and biological systems, using light as both a reagent that initiates the chemistry and as the product of excited state reactivity of organic molecules.
The latter can stay on indefinitely because new photons are continually produced by atoms boosted to an excited state by a power source.
The eight chapters provided in this volume review computational methods for novice chemists and expert computational scientists, including methods needed to compute pi interactions, weakly bound clusters, excited state properties using time-dependent density functional theory, and quantum phase transitions.
For instance, adding an extra electron to the quantum dot generally produces a ground state structure of energy levels resembling that observed when the quantum dot, was in its first excited state, before the addition.
Chemical Reactivity in the ground and the excited state
This will rely on the unprecedented combination of two-photon excitation of a d-block luminophore (Pt- or Ir-based) having a long-lived excited state, followed by partial d-f energy-transfer to sensitise the lanthanide ion.
It is thought to be the single strongest emission from newly forming stars; hydrogen atoms radiate this ultraviolet light when an electron falls from the first excited state to the ground state.
In this case, the chemical compound absorbs photons, jumping to an excited state and emitting luminescent light, which can be repeated infinitely and last anywhere from six to 10+ hours.
Much like the ticking of a pocket watch, the ytterbium clocks tick off seconds by measuring the frequency of light absorbed by atoms as electrons in the ground state jump to an excited state.
Much of this energy goes into maintaining a majority of the atoms or molecules of the lasing material in an excited state.
We are in a unique position to probe the details of the dynamics on the excited state and the subsequent evolution of ground state products.