excoriation


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Related to excoriation: neurotic excoriation

excoriation

[ek‚skȯr·ē′ā·shən]
(medicine)
Abrasion of a portion of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent and successful excoriation of the Palestinians before a receptive American audience made it easy to miss the subplot, which was the alleged threat posed by Iran.
After all, it is one thing to be the subject of public criticism, but it's another thing entirely to willingly provide the forum for your own public excoriation.
Peter's excoriation of the bad shepherds has often been read as a denunciation of the Laudian clergy, and Milton himself encouraged this notion when (in the 1645 edition of his poems) he added a headnote to "Lycidas" identifying the bad shepherds as "our corrupted Clergy then in their height.
Vivian May, in discussing the "Mississippi mother's chosen complicity, her continual labor of ignorance" (107), emphasizes Brooks's excoriation of the character; Laura Dawkins, in discussing "the white mother's devastating realization of her husband's capacity for violence against a helpless child" (113), emphasizes Brooks's empathy with her.
The relation of psychogenic excoriation with psychiatric disorders: A comparative study.
Signs and symptoms include redness, excoriation, pain, burning, itching, and skin tightness.
The most common complications related to established PEG tubes are local infection, skin excoriation and blockages.
Furthermore, pay package scrutiny at a merger by shareholders, the media, and the potential excoriation and reputational risk to board members, makes the stakes even greater.
The Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) was used to assess four individual symptoms of atopic dermatitis: erythema, induration/papulation, excoriation and lichenification together with the percentage of body surface affected in different areas.
Despite the pitfalls -- a potential loss visitors, which in turn would drive down ad revenue, not to mention excoriation by colleagues and "the Internet is free" mavens -- more publishing executives in recent days have said they're going to put their proverbial toes into the proverbial water.
The result was an excoriation by the Tax Court (17) and a notice from counsel that this should not be done again.
Finkelstein time and space to state his views, and acknowledge the efforts of the school's students in bringing him to campus, we are obligated to state strong disagreement with his excoriation of Israel and naive acceptance of the Palestinian view of recent Middle East conflicts.