exhaust stream

exhaust stream

[ig′zȯst ‚strēm]
(aerospace engineering)
The stream of matter or radiation emitted from the nozzle of a rocket or other reaction engine.
References in periodicals archive ?
This enables the system to function without the need to inject fuel into the exhaust stream.
But, like wind generation, some of this free kinetic energy must remain in the exhaust stream.
x] reduction of upto 20% was obtained due to unburned hydrogen in the exhaust stream.
Thanks to a novel spiral heat exchanger that enhances 50% the exchange surface, C-Heat compact solution shows 100% energy efficiency by capturing almost all latent heat of condensation of water vapor in the exhaust stream.
After a detailed review with the site engineering team, Babcock Wanson recommended replacing the existing Catalytic Thermal Oxidisers with a more effective Regenerative Thermal Oxidiser capable of treating the complete cooking exhaust stream irrespective of the process heat load, an important feature in the fast moving food industry.
A fire can advance very quickly in an exhaust stream--with a typical duct velocity of 1,500 feet per minute in a 15-foot long duct, it takes only six-tenths of a second for a fire to travel in the exhaust stream from the fusible links in a duct opening to the exhaust fan inlet.
In order to ensure sufficient NOx reduction, a small amount of excess diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) is injected into the exhaust stream.
Diesel exhaust fluid, or DEF, "is a solution of urea and de-ionized water that, when injected into the exhaust stream (a process known as selective catalytic reduction) eliminates 90 percent of exhaust pollutants by converting them to nitrogen and water," according to the company's website.
Diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) is injected into the exhaust stream of the engine, runs through a catalyst, and turns the NOx in the exhaust into harmless water vapor and nitrogen gas.
Sabic's Technical Grade Urea will enable cleaner diesel technology in engines through liquid injection of urea solution into the exhaust stream of the diesel engine prior to its catalytic converter.
The system enabling this performance consists of three components: a carbon capture unit utilising absorbent materials that can capture CO2 from the exhaust stream, a compression and storage system, and a unit recycling the heat produced by the vehicle to operate the whole carbon capture system onboard, without any additional or external energy supply.