exhaust stroke


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exhaust stroke

[ig′zȯst ‚strōk]
(mechanical engineering)
The stroke of an engine, pump, or compressor that expels the fluid from the cylinder.

exhaust stroke

exhaust stroke
Induction stroke.
exhaust stroke
Compression stroke.
exhaust stroke
Power stroke.
exhaust stroke
Exhaust stroke.
The fourth stroke in a reciprocating engine in which the piston is moving away from the crankshaft and the exhaust valve is open to permit expulsion of burned gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the four-stroke cycle, you might find that the exhaust stroke is not fully successful some of the exhaust gases remain within the cylinder, which might mix with the incoming intake charge.
With early EVC timing, the exhaust stroke is truncated by valve closure, thereby increasing the amount of exhaust gas trapped at the end of the stroke.
meaning that the mag doesn't fire into the exhaust stroke, but it does fire into a fuel/air charge that's already well into combustion.
So during the exhaust stroke there is a chance for the exhaust gases to accumulate inside the engine which decreases the volumetric efficiency of the engine.
The membrane, which is constructed from corrosion-resistant spring material, is larger than the piston and is fixed in such a way that it can be bumped by the piston at the extreme of the exhaust stroke and flexed open while producing little or no noise and incurring no mechanical damage.
The exhaust stroke occurs when the leading decreasing chamber volume (as the chamber moves uphill) forces the exhaust out, starting the cycle anew.
During the exhaust stroke, combustion products (marked with red arrows) exit the active chamber via the rotor exhaust port, entering the interior volume of the rotor, therefore mixing with the rotor cooling air (blue arrows).
The exhaust stroke cam profile has changed for required position of the follower under acceleration and retardation motion.
They operate on the same 4-stroke principle as your car engine or other 4-cycle engines, that is, intake, compression, power and exhaust strokes, The Gade difference is that it does not have a traditional exhaust stroke where, after traveling to bottom dead center on the power stroke, the piston pushes the hot burned gases up out of the top of the cylinder on the exhaust stroke.
During the exhaust stroke, a small portion of exhaust gas is routed through this passage back into the cylinder, where it is mixed with intake air.
Before you get too excited about the prospects of diesel, uh, compression-ignition engines becoming the predominant automotive powerplant, consider one of the remaining roadblocks in their path: particulate emissions, the tiny specks of grit that are blasted out of the combustion chamber with each exhaust stroke.
In the exhaust stroke the piston rises again and drives out about 90 percent of the exhaust gases in the cylinder.