exhibition


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exhibition:

see expositionexposition
or exhibition,
term frequently applied to an organized public fair or display of industrial and artistic productions, designed usually to promote trade and to reflect cultural progress.
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Exhibition

 

in art, a display of various works of art, as well as artifacts of material culture or historical documents, that is presented according to a definite system in a museum, in an exhibition hall, or in the open air.

The purpose and tasks of both temporary and permanent exhibitions are to make as clear as possible the artistic or scientific value of the exhibits, their place in the historicocultural process, and their specific features. An exhibition may be arranged without a fixed plan, or the visitor’s viewing route may be taken into account. Today, exhibitions are often provided with equipment designed to preserve the material on view by regulating, for example, temperature and humidity. Labels that provide a brief description of an exhibit are used, as is more extended documentation.

The arrangement of an exhibition is of great importance in art museums; one of the finest museum exhibitions in the USSR is the permanent collection at the Hermitage in Leningrad. Interesting possibilities for arranging works of various types of art—graphic art, painting, sculpture, and applied art—in a single display were discovered when laying out the art sections of the Soviet pavilions at the world’s fairs of the 1960’s and 1970’s.

exhibition

Brit an allowance or scholarship awarded to a student at a university or school
References in classic literature ?
You can't have forgotten that you assured me most solemnly that nothing in the world would induce you to send it to any exhibition.
No, Jack," she said; "you know I do not approve of such exhibitions.
But the principal attraction was the exhibition of the Long Noses, a show to which Europe is as yet a stranger.
But no symptom of that incipient affection which was to govern her life, could either of her parents ever discover; and in the exhibitions of her attachments, there was nothing to be seen but that quiet and regulated esteem, which grows out of association and good sense, and which is so obviously different from the restless and varying emotions that are said to belong to the passion of love.
But why, unless for the love of the life those effigies shared with us in their wandering impassivity, should one try to reproduce in words an impression of whose fidelity there can be no critic and no judge, since such an exhibition of the art of shipbuilding and the art of figure-head carving as was seen from year's end to year's end in the open-air gallery of the New South Dock no man's eye shall behold again?
Men and women came, and some looked eagerly in and pressed their faces against the bars; others glanced carelessly at the body and turned away with a disappointed look--people, I thought, who live upon strong excitements and who attend the exhibitions of the Morgue regularly, just as other people go to see theatrical spectacles every night.
The regiments who had seen the feat cheered wildly at this exhibition of the white man's magic, which they took as an omen of success, while the force the general had belonged to--which, indeed, as we ascertained afterwards, he had commanded--fell back in confusion.
And the worst of it was that, though you hated Strickland, and the exhibition was horrible, it was impossible not to laugh.
Haarlem, having placed on exhibition its favourite, having advertised its love of flowers in general and of tulips in particular, at a period when the souls of men were filled with war and sedition, -- Haarlem, having enjoyed the exquisite pleasure of admiring the very purest ideal of tulips in full bloom, -- Haarlem, this tiny town, full of trees and of sunshine, of light and shade, had determined that the ceremony of bestowing the prize should be a fete which should live for ever in the memory of men.
Discovering that his martingale had more slack in it than usual, he proceeded to give an exhibition of rearing and hind-leg walking.
In order to make the exhibition interesting, he was kept in a rage most of the time.
It was my intention to send both portraits to the Royal Academy Exhibition, to get custom, and show the public generally what I could do.