exogamy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

exogamy

(ĕksŏg`əmē): see marriagemarriage,
socially sanctioned union that reproduces the family. In all societies the choice of partners is generally guided by rules of exogamy (the obligation to marry outside a group); some societies also have rules of endogamy (the obligation to marry within a group).
..... Click the link for more information.
.

exogamy

a rule prescribing marriage outside a given social group. The group may belong to a LINEAGE, CASTE, CLASS, ethnic affiliation or other social classification. Structural anthropologists have seen this practice as an exchange of women between groups which contributes to social stability. It may, therefore, be enforced by the use of INCEST TABOOs. The converse of exogamy is ENDOGAMY.

Exogamy

 

the practice of marrying only outside one’s own group, as prescribed by law or custom in the age of the primitive communal system. The ban could apply to marriages within one’s family group (such as the clan or phratry) or, more rarely, to marriages within one’s regional group or community. The prohibition against such marriages was retained in later times.

There are numerous theories concerning the origin of exogamy; the theories basically fall into three groups. Some researchers, including L. H. Morgan, believe the practice arose from the need to avoid the possibly harmful consequences of marriages between blood relatives. Others, including E. Tylor, A. M. Zolota-rev, and C. Levi-Strauss, regard it as an attempt to expand social contacts and initiate relations with other groups. Still others, including S. P. Tolstov and Iu. I. Semenov, regard it as a means of establishing social peace within a group, since sexual relations and the conflicts that accompany them are thus carried beyond the confines of the group.

REFERENCES

Engels, F. Proiskhozhdenie sem’i, chastnoi sobstvennosti i gosudarstva. In K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed, vol. 21.
Semenov, Iu. I. Proiskhozhdenie braka i sem’i. Moscow, 1974.
Pervobytnoe obshchestvo: Osnovnye problemy razvitiia. Moscow, 1975.

exogamy

[ek′säg·ə·mē]
(genetics)
Union of gametes from organisms that are not closely related. Also known as outbreeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrary to the received wisdom that exogamy necessarily attenuates Jewish identity, the intermarriage plot in Other Things Being Equal sets in motion a journey that brings Wolf's protagonist closer to her Jewishness, but one that at the same time compels a redefinition of what it means to be Jewish and American.
A second benefit from exogamy is that the pool of potential marriage partners is larger.
Karl Abraham's 1913 psychoanalytic essay, "Neurotic Exogamy," explicitly situates the incest anxiety as tied to exogamous impulses, and though his argument is presented as universally applicable, he focuses extensively on Jewish male patients.
16) There are, of course, various prohibitions against exogamy in the Hebrew scripture.
Exogamy and endogamy run parallel to each other, though the strange woman maintains a certain something that sets her apart.
This fact, combined with the greater racial exogamy of black men, reduces the odds of marriage for black women.
Table 4 above shows similar levels of exogamy in both groups at 20 and 23 per cent respectively.
For Smith, the disgust triggered by such troubling unions upheld patrilineal descent and lineage exogamy, and further "protect[ed] the lineages against disorganisation through competition over women" (Smith 1962:120).
Fanny, Cleere points out, is "more economical than a daughter because she is the compromise of exogamy and incest" (129).
They argue further that the North Indian kinship and marriage systems based on village exogamy compared with South Indian systems of cousin marriages have led to lower rates of female seclusion and a more favourable sex ratio for women in South India than in the North (Dyson and Moore, 1983).
They are the degree of value placed on the culture's traditional language, the degree of cultural similarity to Anglo-Australians, and the degree of exogamy or marriage outside the culture (Clyne 1985: 3).
As imaginary organ, the heart in this exchange between Giovanni and Soranzo points towards exogamy and comedy; as organ at the end of the dagger it points to incest and tragedy.