exotic

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exotic

[ig′zäd·ik]
(ecology)
Not endemic to an area.
References in classic literature ?
His smooth cheek was begrimed and flushed, and the coal dust on his eyelids, like the black pencilling of a make-up, enhanced the liquid brilliance of the whites, giving to his youthful face something of a feminine, exotic and fascinating aspect.
The cars available are some of the latest exotics to hit the market and are guaranteed to generate excitement.
The County conservation lands contain a wide variety of exotics ranging from grasses to large trees.
From Mango Peach Pineapple to Strawberry Dragon Fruit the Nestle Pure Life Exotics Sparkling Waters Offer a Great Alternative to Sugary Beverages and Delivers a Burst of Refreshing Fruit Flavor in Each Sip
Luckily for me, I was the only technician at the practice who liked birds, so I got to help with all of the bird cases that came in and found that I really enjoyed working with birds and exotics in a private practice setting as well.
Brits are getting increasingly adventurous in the fruit aisle, with exotics such as pomegranates and persimmons thriving while sales of better-known exotics such as mangoes and pineapples are declining.
Carpenter believes that although some exotics aren't pet material, others make good pets--for people who've done their homework.
The results indicate a greater number of exotics in the woods in comparison to the prairie-forest edge.
While most buyers in this market aren't considering the purchase of an exotic car as an investment, depreciation is a consideration, especially in this market where it can be particularly brutal (see sidebar "Exotics as Investments").
Queeley describes exotics as eccentric--and offers advice on how to handle and display such flora:
Sadly specialist rescue centres are full of abandoned exotics which are difficult to re-home.
Amateur botanists and association members work to perfect the exotics they raise, then pass that knowledge on to academics and eventually to commercial farmers.