experiential


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experiential

Philosophy relating to or derived from experience; empirical
References in periodicals archive ?
65% of marketers are seeing a direct sales lift as the result of experiential marketing.
At the Foundation, we've seen great success across the country with experiential learning financial education programs such as reality fairs and retirement fairs," Lois Kitsch, a national program director at the Foundation, said.
Christie Experiential Networks (CEN) adds a new layer to how Christie brings value to the cinema industry.
Nick Hill, Sales Director of SpaceandPeople says "We have found a significant increase in brands using experiential marketing activity to truly engage with customers and deliver quantifiable ROI results.
D'Andrea's forward-view on the industry has earned him a place among thought leaders rapidly transforming experiential into a vital and increasingly standalone marketing channel for major brands.
In "Differences between Experiential and Classroom Learning," Coleman argued that traditional classrooms use an information-assimilation process in which students receive information through lectures and textbooks, organize the information, draw inferences to apply the information, and act on the inferences.
Although adverbialism is appealing because it can cover the kind of cases that HOTT cannot, its main demerit is that it seems to preclude "the naturalization of experiential intentionality," for it leaves intentionality looking like it cannot be explained in terms of any other properties.
The property-dualist must know much about the nature of the physical so that he can confidently claim that the experiential is nonreducible, or at least, incomprehensibly physical (as Nagel once claimed.
The purpose of this article is to present and discuss several experiential activities and curricula specifically designed to promote competency in awareness, knowledge, and skills in students with regard to diversity and multicultural issues.
The authors describe rational thinking as "logical, effortful, and analytic," and experiential thinking as "associative, lower effort, and holistic.
Some have compared teaching entrepreneurship without the experiential process to teaching someone to swim without a pool.