expression


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expression

1. communication of emotion through music, painting, etc.
2. Maths a variable, function, or some combination of constants, variables, or functions
3. Genetics the effect of a particular gene on the phenotype

expression

[ik′spresh·ən]
(chemical engineering)
Separation of liquid from a two-phase solid-liquid system by compression under conditions that permit liquid to escape while the solid is retained between the compressing surfaces. Also known as mechanical expression.
(computer science)
A mathematical or logical statement written in a source language, consisting of a collection of operands connected by operations in a logical manner.

expression

(programming)
Any piece of program code in a high-level language which, when (if) its execution terminates, returns a value. In most programming languages, expressions consist of constants, variables, operators, functions, and parentheses. The operators and functions may be built-in or user defined. Languages differ on how expressions of different types may be combined - with some combination of explicit casts and implicit coercions.

The syntax of expressions generally follows conventional mathematical notation, though some languages such as Lisp or Forth have their own idiosyncratic syntax.

expression

(1) See Expression Studio.

(2) In programming, a line of source code that returns a value when executed. An expression can comprise any combination of variables, values, operators and functions. For example, a=b+c and price=2*cost are expressions. The more complicated expression (strlen(text_string)*2) is a C example that uses a string length function and returns a value that is twice the number of characters in the string of text. See regular expression.
References in classic literature ?
The old man's eyes beamed with an expression of gentle affection.
An expression of intense joy illumined the old man's eyes.
He forgot his solo, and the expected compliments; and, for the rest of the evening, that thrilling expression floated in his brain, and was present to his thoughts; it was worth a thousand of the studied glances that were continually aimed at him from all sides of the room, and with every variety of eye--from the piercing black, to the ogling gray.
But, the moment that George was called on to take his part in the entertainment, this restlessness disappeared, and was succeeded by an expression of intense interest and deep anxiety.
A woman's eye can read the face of the man she loves, its every feeling of pride, its every expression of suffering; it might almost be said that Heaven has graciously granted to women, on account of their very weakness, more than it has accorded to other creatures.
By the smile that has just marred the expression of your countenance, Be candid, and tell me what your thought was -- no secrets between friends.
Prince Vasili said no more and his cheeks began to twitch nervously, now on one side, now on the other, giving his face an unpleasant expression which was never to be seen on it in a drawing room.
you should not blame them for a lack of the finer elements of feeling and expression which after a thousand years of civilization distinguish such delicate spirits as Keats and Tennyson.
But the expression of her face, scared and gloomy, did not now promise even deception.
An expression of unspeakable joy lightened the countenance of Milady; but this expression was fleeting as the reflection of lightning.
He chooses to depict people from humble life, because, being nearer to nature than others, they are on the whole more impassioned, certainly [102] more direct in their expression of passion, than other men; it is for this direct expression of passion that he values their humble words.
I recognized the quaint little gray curls, the gentle, genial expression, the mole at the corner of the mouth.