extent


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extent

1. US Law a writ authorizing a person to whom a debt is due to assume temporary possession of his debtor's lands
2. Logic another word for extension (sense 6)

extent

[ik′stent]
(computer science)
The physical locations in a mass-storage device or volume allocated for use by a particular data set.

extent

(1) Contiguous space on a disk reserved for a file or application.

(2) A contiguous set of blocks in a database.
References in classic literature ?
He loses, in an extent proportioned to the weakness or force of his original nature, the capability of self-support.
Perchance, when, in the course of ages, American liberty has become a fiction of the past--as it is to some extent a fiction of the present--the poets of the world will be inspired by American mythology.
Here, again, the extent of the Union gives it the most palpable advantage.
Several large islands certainly exist in the lake; one of which is said to be mountainous, but not by any means to the extent required to furnish the series of peaks above mentioned.
I put forward my arm, and shuddered to find that I had fallen at the very brink of a circular pit, whose extent, of course, I had no means of ascertaining at the moment.
He confessed to them that the object was not to learn to what extent the French merchants were injured by English smuggling, but to learn how far French smuggling could annoy English trade.
It was just after this adventure that we encountered a continent of immense extent and prodigious solidity, but which, nevertheless, was supported entirely upon the back of a sky-blue cow that had no fewer than four hundred horns.
Johnson, but now the extent of my aversion is not to be estimated.
He pointed with a sweeping gesture, as though calling Adam's attention to the extent of the view.
The dialect was on her tongue to some extent, despite the village school: the characteristic intonation of that dialect for this district being the voicing approximately rendered by the syllable UR, probably as rich an utterance as any to be found in human speech.
We have now considered that art of money-getting which is not necessary, and have seen in what manner we became in want of it; and also that which is necessary, which is different from it; for that economy which is natural, and whose object is to provide food, is not like this unlimited in its extent, but has its bounds.
My dream personality lived in the long ago, before ever man, as we know him, came to be; and my other and wake-a-day personality projected itself, to the extent of the knowledge of man's existence, into the substance of my dreams.