external force

external force

[ek¦stərn·əl ′fȯrs]
(mechanics)
A force exerted on a system or on some of its components by an agency outside the system.
References in classic literature ?
The utility of a Confederacy, as well to suppress faction and to guard the internal tranquillity of States, as to increase their external force and security, is in reality not a new idea.
It is very probable," (says he[1]) "that mankind would have been obliged at length to live constantly under the government of a single person, had they not contrived a kind of constitution that has all the internal advantages of a republican, together with the external force of a monarchical government.
A republic of this kind, able to withstand an external force, may support itself without any internal corruptions.
But if the members of an oligarchy agree among themselves the state is not very easily destroyed without some external force.
The prospector cannot turn unless its nose is deflected from the outside--by some external force or resistance--the steering wheel within would have moved in response.
On the one hand, it will be said, if concessions are made, the Parliament endanger the loss of their authority over the Colony: on the other hand, if external forces should be used, there seems to be danger of a total lasting alienation of affection.
But states often collapse as an unintended consequence of the presence of a supporting external force.
A spokeswoman for Cleveland Police confirmed it is now being investigated by an external force - the Met Deputy Chief Constable Ian Spittal said: "The allegations were made directly to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), who referred the matters back to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC).
The efforts the implant is subjected to have a variation of the pulsating cycle type to which the external force (the loading) varies from 0 to a maximum value.
He will rely on gravity to supply this external force to his skateboard or snowboard.
He writes that a perfect example of Newton's first law of motion--which states that an object in motion stays in motion until met by an external force, and that the more massive the object, the more inclined it is to continue to move--is William "The Refrigerator" Perry, an occasional fullback for the Chicago Bears in the 1980s.
Aimlessly, as though guided by some external force, they wander around, stop and stand still, light up a cigarette, make faces in the camera-by chance, or deliberately?