extirpate

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extirpate

[′ek·stər‚pāt]
(biology)
To uproot, destroy, make extinct, or exterminate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two indices of diversity were calculated for each sample: 1) the diversity of extant individuals and 2) the total diversity at the site represented by extant and extirpated individuals.
Regarding the question of whether this population of invasive species is now extirpated, we cannot conclusively answer that.
The penguin population could be extirpated within 20 years unless B09B relocates or the now perennial fast ice within the bay breaks out.
The Cape Denison population could be extirpated within 20 years.
Populations formerly known to occur in the Des Moines and Iowa River watersheds in west-central Iowa were apparently extirpated by the 1990s (Clark, 2000).
The governor greatly commended the sacrifices of the Pak Army jawans, police and other security forces as well as the tribal people in the successful war against terrorism and stated that terrorists would be extirpated at all cost and their hideouts destroyed.
Of those, ten are considered extirpated (although the Illinois Department of Natural Resources stocked the Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, into the Illinois River drainage), one is federally-endangered, 18 others are state-endangered, and 16 are state-threatened (Burr and Page 2009; IESPB 2015).
I am sure the security forces of the Kingdom will deal with such elements with an iron fist and will not rest until the perpetrators of the Al-Ahsa attack are extirpated.
The antrochoanal polyp was extirpated completely through the oropharynx using forceps.
Our oldest specimen, an Atlantic salmon from 1857, represents a species once extremely abundant in Lake Ontario before European settlement, but extirpated by 1900.
Although widespread and quite secure in some areas, in many parts of the range golden eagles have experienced sharp population declines and have even been extirpated from some areas.
NPS and partners have made major strides in scientific research, ecological monitoring, removal of non-native animals, reestablishment of extirpated species, establishment of no-harvest marine zones, and expanded opportunities for the public to learn about and experience the islands.