Extravagance

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Extravagance

Bovary, Emma
spends money recklessly on jewelry and clothes. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary, Magill I, 539–541]
Cleopatra’s pearl
dissolved in acid to symbolize luxury. [Rom. Hist.: Jobes, 348]
References in periodicals archive ?
The one good thing that can come out of a recession is that people tend to examine their lifestyles and cut back on the extravagancies that they now take for granted.
66) One of his milder strictures follows: 'I have always observed that those who know the least of our Art, nay that can scarcely distinguish the five Orders, are always the most fruitful Inventors of Whim and Extravagancies, and they are generally talkative in Proportion to their Want of Skill' (ibid.
Today's modest farm house, set in more than 190 acres of prime Welsh countryside, gives little clue to the tragedies, extravagancies and acrimonious disputes that have taken place in this tranquil corner of Carmarthenshire over the centuries.
Vince and Vance Moss were far from the Caribbean extravagancies when they spent a nearly four-month stay in Afghanistan, providing medical attention to the sick and injured in war-torn villages.
Memories of the divided churches and the extravagancies that accompanied the Great Awakening of the 1740s haunted the region.
He was head boy in his house; 'the Masters were glad to compound for a few extravagancies, and he did pretty much as he liked'.
26) Glicera in The City Jilt, 76, is scolded by the narrator for sending a bitter, scolding letter to Melladore ("a letter of this sort would have but little effect on the Person to whom it was sent"); and Fantomina, when she realizes that her lover will be unfaithful to her, decides that "Complaints, Tears, Swoonings, and all the Extravagancies which Women make use of in such Cases have little Prevailance over a Heart inclin'd to rove" (51).
He warned his listeners that there was "every probability" that the payroll taxes for Social Security "will be used for current deficits and new extravagancies.
He further notes that for Unamuno redemptive madness is an antidote to sterile logic; Don Quixote's extravagancies are a form of rebellion against this tyranny of the spirit (103)--and as Unamuno wryly adds to his discourse, this madness is "loco, y no tonto" (145) ("crazy, but not stupid").
Here, a sampling of some of the best new extravagancies that a guest can anticipate: