face area

face area

[′fās ‚er·ē·ə]
(mining engineering)
The working area toward the interior of the last open crosscut in an entry or room.
References in periodicals archive ?
The volumetric airflow of the fume hood was determined using the relationship Q = VA where Q is volumetric flow (L/s [cfm]), V is face velocity (m/s [fpm]), and A is the face area with the sash fully open ([m.
It was not easy to recognize my son especially due to the changes in the body and face area, but the body was not frozen and we could easily wrap it and bury it," he said.
This year's event saw more working demonstrations than ever before, according to show organizers, "creating some of the busiest live action ever seen at Hillhead, including no fewer than 14 excavators in new-look quarry face area at one point during the show.
The victim repeatedly told him he did not want trouble and tried to pull away - but was punched to the face, dropped to the floor, may have blacked out and felt blows to the head and face area.
He shot this lady once and then he shot her again, he fell to the floor, leant over shot her once more in the face area.
He said the contact was in the shoulder or face area, and that Ward, of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, also threatened to "glass" the entertainer.
This small area in the brain, called the visual word form area, is found in the left side of the visual cortex, opposite from the fusiform face area on the right side, which remembers how faces look.
Paramedics attended the scene to treat the victim, from the Clock Face area, for a head injury.
The face area of the classic Stormtrooper has a rounded trim at the bottom.
In the new study, the researchers found that IFJ coordinates with a brain region that processes faces, known as the fusiform face area (FFA), and a region that interprets information about places, known as the parahippocampal place area (PPA).
And fat hits mostly the abdomen, buttocks, chest, and face area.
This brain area, called the fusiform face area, would light up with activity when subjects viewed faces, but showed less activity when subjects viewed other objects such as houses.