faceted spur

faceted spur

[′fas·əd·əd ′spər]
(geology)
A spur or ridge with an inverted-V face resulting from faulting or from the trimming, beveling, or truncating motion of streams, waves, or glaciers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fast uplift is considered to produce straight mountain-piedmont junctions, narrow valleys with steep long profiles and faceted spur ridges, whereas slow uplift results in embayed mountain-piedmont junctions, broad valleys with gentle long profiles and strongly degraded spurs (Bull, 1987).
The size of a faceted spur is a function of the distance between major canyons incised into the mountain front and of the spur's height (Fig.
Flights of faceted spurs have been interpreted as a result of either episodic uplift (Hamblin, 1976; Anderson, 1977), or distributed faulting within the range-bounding fault (Menges, 1988; Zuchiewicz and McCalpin, 2000).
The geometry of faceted spurs developed on differentiated bedrock, although controlled primarily by the rate of seismotectonic uplift, is frequently modified by resistance to erosion and structure of the bedrock (cf.
This staircase arrangements of faceted spurs points to at least five episodes of uplift of the SMF footwall, probably starting shortly after 31 Ma, i.
1977, Compound faceted spurs and recurrent movement in the Wasatch fault zone, north-central Utah, Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.