palsy

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palsy:

see paralysisparalysis
or palsy
, complete loss or impairment of the ability to use voluntary muscles, usually as the result of a disorder of the nervous system. The nervous tissue that is injured may be in the brain, the spinal cord, or in the muscles themselves.
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palsy

[′pȯl·zē]
(medicine)
Any of various special types of paralysis, such as cerebral palsy.

palsy

Pathol
paralysis, esp of a specified type
References in periodicals archive ?
If the facial nerve palsy is not treated with steroids, the likelihood of permanent facial paralysis is increased.
Other findings included pupils equal and reactive to light, full extraocular movements, a left upper motor neuron (UMN) facial nerve palsy, decreased tone and no motor power on the left upper limb, increased tone and decreased power in the left lower limb, with normal tone and weakness on the right side.
Facial nerve palsy attributable to a cystic lesion of the temporal bone is relatively rare.
Clinically our patient has improved, with resolution of her pain, headaches and facial nerve palsy.
Management of ophthalmic complications of facial nerve palsy.
One patient who underwent complete tumor resection with preservation of cranial nerves suffered from facial nerve palsy, which improved over the first postoperative year.
facial nerve palsy, vertigo, meningitis, or brain abscess).
Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis for facial nerve palsy following surgery for cerebellopontine angle tumors.
Herpes zoster oticus, a disorder presenting with unilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy and herpes zoster infection of the ear, with or without hearing loss, (2) is caused by the reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus.
A painless polyp of unusual appearance with facial nerve palsy and mastoid air cell destruction should suggest to the clinician the possibility of a malignancy in the middle ear.
l-3) The clinical diagnosis of a temporal bone fracture is based on the presence of otorrhea, hemotympanum, and facial nerve palsy in a patient with head trauma.
Physical examination revealed grade V left facial nerve palsy.