fahlore


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fahlore

[′fä‚lȯr]
(mineralogy)
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They suggest that mixed smelting of stannite, fahlore and chalcopyrite produced compositionally variable copper-tin alloys c.
and Foit, Jr, E, 2003, Fahlore as a petrogenetic indicator, Keno Hill Ag-Pb-Zn district, Yukon, Canada: Mineralogical Magazine, v.
Traditionally, copper with significant impurities of arsenic, antimony, silver and nickel is thought to originate from fahlore smelting (Otto & Witter 1952; Merkl 2010).
They form three compositional groups: stannite bronze, high-tin fahlore bronze and low-tin fahlore bronze.
It has a metallic grey lustre, similar to fahlore with which it is easily confused, with an olive-green tint, particularly when it is partly weathered and intergrown with secondary copper minerals.
Visual appearance was also decisive in recognising copper minerals rich in stannite and/or fahlore.
Cupriferous and argentiferous Fahlore was extracted on a large scale and the area became one of Europe's leading mining centres in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries AD, as celebrated in the sixteenth-century 'Schwazer Bergbuch' (Bartels et al.
Archaeological field research undertaken since the 1990s has revealed that the area had also been the location of a mining boom from the Late Bronze to the Early Iron Age, also targeting the copper-bearing Fahlore deposits (Rieser & Schrattenthaler 2000; Goldenberg & Rieser 2004).
Prehistoric Fahlore mining and smelting in the Mauken Valley, North-Tyrol, in P.
Fahlore smelting is attested at Brixlegg in the Austrian Tyrol at 3960-3650 cal BC (OXA-7696 5000 [+ or -] 80 BP) and may even date to the later fifth millennium (there are two dates for the Miinchh6fener cultural level in which the metal working is found of 5570 [+ or -] 50 BP (GrN-22167), 4500-4330 cal BC and 5480 [+ or -] 60 BP (GrN-21364), 4460-4160 cal BC) (Huijsmans & Krauss 1998; Bartelheim et al.
He grounded this reading in the consideration that arsenic- and antimony-rich objects would have been obtained from the smelting of fahlores (i.
Significantly, this would tie in with analogous evidence from both Italy and Europe, which pushes back the smelting of copper sulphides including fahlores to the earliest stages of metal production (Ryndina et al.