faint blue galaxies

faint blue galaxies

The faintest galaxies detectable, which show an enhancement in the number of blue, and hence star-forming, systems. The bulk of star formation occurred around redshifts 1 to 2, and the reason for the subsequent demise of this population of faint blue galaxies remains unclear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthony Tyson (then in the physics division of AT&T Bell Laboratories) and his colleagues noticed the systematic alignment of a few dozen faint blue galaxies behind two massive foreground galaxy clusters, Abell 1689 and CL 1409+52.
They associate the faint red population with faint blue galaxies that have become satellite galaxies.
Tyson, a physicist and observational cosmologist, discovered faint blue galaxies and is currently involved in a project to map the large-scale distribution of dark matter in the universe.
At the time, Ferguson was wrestling with a long-standing problem posed by ground-based astronomy: why were there so many more faint blue galaxies than the then-standard theory of galaxy formation predicted?
One possible explanation was that the faint blue galaxies were dwarfs, and that the universe once had hosted many more of those tiny galaxies than it does today.
The redshifts we obtained for the faint blue galaxies revealed that they are indeed members of distant clusters and not just field interlopers.
Deep CCD images were used to identify a swell in the number of faint blue galaxies at deeper apparent magnitudes.
He says the low-surface-brightness ones "can alleviate many outstanding problems in extragalactic astronomy which, like the faint blue galaxies, require more objects than provided by the local luminosity function.