the Fall

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fall, the,

i.e., the fall of man, in Christian thought: see original sinoriginal sin,
in Christian theology, the sin of Adam, by which all humankind fell from divine grace. Saint Augustine was the fundamental theologian in the formulation of this doctrine, which states that the essentially graceless nature of humanity requires redemption to save it.
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; gracegrace,
in Christian theology, the free favor of God toward humans, which is necessary for their salvation. A distinction is made between natural grace (e.g., the gift of life) and supernatural grace, by which God makes a person (born sinful because of original sin) capable of
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Fall, The

tale of the monotonous life and indifference of modern man. [Fr. Lit.: The Fall]
References in classic literature ?
Ducks and geese frequent it in the spring and fall, the white-bellied swallows (Hirundo bicolor) skim over it, and the peetweets (Totanus macularius) "teeter" along its stony shores all summer.
When the simple threshold-based detection was combined with posture detection after the fall, the thresholds obtained resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of fall detection of 95%-100%.
Hence, birth rates fall, the workforce shrinks, and the share of the graying population rises.
If they fall, the harness catches them before they hit the ground.
Much as a movie heroine tumbles off cliffs but routinely manages to grab something to stop her fall, the female worker ants of the species Cephalotes atratus guide their plunges so they typically veer into a tree trunk, according to Stephen P.
Last fall, the college was able to offer 60 courses in Palmdale, but when SR Technics closed its business the college had to move out.
If you don't find out "why" on the first fall, the resident will fall again.
In fall, the idea is to break apart a flock of turkeys - that is, physically rush or charge into the gathering to disperse them - then wait for the birds to reassemble.
Historians have often argued that another meteorite fall, the spectacular shower of 3,000 stones at l'Aigle in the French province of Normandy in 1803, sparked the early investigation of meteorites.