falling leaf

falling leaf

falling leaf
An aerobatic maneuver that was very popular in the early days of aviation but is rarely practiced these days. Throughout the maneuver, the aircraft indicated air speed remains just above the stall. It involves the initiation of an incipient spin by bringing the aircraft to the point of stall in level flight, then pulling back on the control column while applying full rudder. As the wing drops, the control column is moved forward to the neutral position to unstall the wings and the opposite rudder is applied and held, stopping the yaw and the incipient spin. Then, the control column is pulled back again while the rudder is held in the same position, thus an opposite direction incipient spin is started. Those sequences are repeated so that as the aircraft mushes down, in and out of the stalled condition, it rocks from side to side in a series of small arcs, as a falling leaf might descend. The process continues until recovery (i.e., the aircraft is brought back into level flight and at a speed well above stalling speed).
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not to argue that the action of the fallen leaf can be simply mapped onto an equivalent emotion, like depression (the leaf falls down, the narrator of the poem feels down); but that the movement a falling leaf makes provides a model of emotion for Ruskin.
To model emotion on a falling leaf holds many parallels with current theories of emotion, particularly those forwarded by Teresa Brennan in The Transmission of Affect.
The helix shape also leaves behind a trace of the movement from which it moves forward: as the leaf emerges from the child-bud and then looks after it, so the falling leaf turns round and round in a movement that imitates the spiroid growth from which it fell.
I am not arguing that either Ruskin or Rossetti takes the image of the falling leaf from one or the other: Rossetti wrote 'A Better Resurrection' in 1857 and published it in Goblin Market and other Poems in 1862; Ruskin published Volume v of Modern Painters in 1860 but had been working on the manuscript from the 1850s.
More likely, this new data indicates Kennedy's Piper Saratoga either fell into what aviators call a ``graveyard spiral'' or spun down like a falling leaf.
The work of Field and his colleagues follows up on a number of recent theoretical studies modeling the tumbling and drifting motion of a falling leaf, sheet of paper, or stiff card (SN: 9/17/94, p.
Murray had total responsibility for hands-on administrative oversight and management of the company's two divisions, Falling Leaf Interactive, an interactive marketing agency, and Select Vermont, a state affinity marketing initiative/e-commerce site devoted to Vermont that maintains two websites.